My Blue Moon Review: Anya’s Garden MoonDance

I’m writing this review on the eve of the blue moon and the new year. This is also the day I decided to try MoonDance from Anya’s Garden for the first time. Coincidence? If it was, it was a subconscious bleary-eyed one this morning. Reaching for my sample I thought I was going to experience a heady tuberose fragrance as I remembered reading on NowSmellThis that MoonDance is an homage to tuberose. Well, there’s tuberose in MoonDance, but not in the way I had expected.

After applying this 100% natural perfume, the scent of violets radiated from my skin. If you’re thinking gentle and sweet violets, then MoonDance will hasten you to rethink your violet notions. We’re talking violets on steriods! The tuberose and jasmine heart of MoonDance supplies our little purple pansies with a hallucinogenic quality, more vivid and intensely sweet than any other violet fragrance in my experience. On my skin, the violet completely took charge of this perfume leaving tuberose and jasmine to lend their indolic fullness in a supporting role. The blend is balanced so harmoniously that the larger-than-life violet doesn’t smell like a tuberosey-violet, rather an amplified version of its inherent components.

MoonDance is a vivacious floral no doubt, but there’s an earthy haylike quality present from chamomile that I adore. The dried grassy aroma tempers MoonDance enough so it doesn’t become cloying or overbearing. After many hours of wear, the violet and white florals settle into a delicate bouquet with just a suggestion of woods. Anya McCoy of Anya’s Flowers isn’t quite satisfied with the use of florals and woods though, even if some of them are rare and exotic. She’s added the peculiar ingredient hyraceum.

I had no idea what this was until I corresponded with her to find out more. I wasn’t expecting to find out that it’s the fosslized pee and poo of the Dr. Seuss-esque named hyrax, pictured here. Apparently tinctured hyraceum has a scent akin to ambergris or oud and can also have a grassy scent due to the hyrax diet. (Who knew fossilized poop as well as chamomile would add that hay note I love so much?) There’s a very informative discussion on Basenotes regarding hyraceum and I encourage you to read it if you have any interest in learning more about it. Since it is fossilized from thousands of years ago, there is no cruelty involved when sourcing these critters’ rock-hard excrement.

(Never did I think I’d end a review with the words “rock-hard excrement”).

Moondance is $125 for 15ml of EdP and $75 for 3.5mls of Parfum Extrait at Anya’s Garden.

Posted by ~Trish

Red Orange Tan and Purple by Mark Rothko

Disclosure: A sample of MoonDance was provided for this review by Anya’s Garden. The opinons in this review are my own. I was not financially compensated for this review or any other.

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7 thoughts on “My Blue Moon Review: Anya’s Garden MoonDance

  1. Hi Trish:
    I’m surprised you find chamomile “haylike”. I’ve never heard it described like that. Green herbal, fruity, floral, light apple-like and delicate are usually words used with chamomile. The opoponax is quite warm and grass like, maybe that’s where you got it?
    Glad the violets “amp” on your skin – that’s the combo of the isolate and the rose/chamomile accord, known for it’s violet scent. And yes, an homage to tuberose – tame tuberose, which is rarely done.
    Thanks for the review!
    Anya

    1. Thanks for reading Anya! Maybe it was the opoponax then? I’ve always found chamomile warm and herbaceous as well as having some hay quality. But maybe I need to smell more high quality chamomile EO in isolation?

      Happy New Year!
      ~T

      1. Trish, I’ll send you some of my chamomile, and some of this opoponax absolute, as it is simply the most beautiful I’ve ever experienced.

        Anya

  2. Oops – forgot to mention – lots of natural perfumers use hyraceum, it’s the new “civet” if you will. I use both the rock and absolute form.

    Anya

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